DIY Home Theater Final Reveal

DIY Home Theater Final Reveal

DIY Home Theater Design - The Final Reveal



It took quite a bit of research and effort to get the theater done and it is finished!

Actually, the theater was finished a while ago but I realized that we never had the reveal along with additional pics of the finished theater.

So here it is, the home theater final reveal!

Disclosure: Some of the links below are affiliate links. If you decide to purchase any of these products, we earn a small commission at no additional cost to you. We recommend these products only because we have experience with them and use them for our own projects. As Amazon Associates, we earn from qualifying purchases.

The Home Theater Final Reveal

This was a pretty big project, it took loads of research, calculations and choices to get to the final product. We decided to do all the work ourselves, which saved us a ton of money and also gives us a sense of accomplishment. 🙂

We love, love, love our theater and use it regularly. For the most part there isn’t much we would change.

There are a couple of things, which I’ll cover at the end of the post.

The Beginning (ish)

Unfortunately, we don’t have any before pics and very few during pics. 🙁

We started the home theater project before we had the idea of starting a blog, and apparently we didn’t do a good job of taking pictures.

Anyhow, here are a few pics of the work in progress. 

Laying Out The Home Theater Seating

Before the room was transformed into a home theater, it was a clean slate for us to work in. It was a regular rectangular room with no closets.

You can get an idea of what it was like before in the picture below.

We ordered the seating before we did anything else. There was a sale so we pulled the trigger.

We ordered the seating based on the measurements that they had online. Needless to say we were a bit nervous that the measurements would have been off… luckily everything worked out. 🙂

Once the layout was ironed out I started work on the riser.

And before I got too far into the riser construction I tested the height of the risers with the chairs to make sure things were still lining up the way I wanted it to. That’s me in the last pic testing the riser height with the chairs in place.

Laying Out The Home Theater Seating
Testing The Home Theater Seating Layout With The Height Of The Risers
Laying Out The Home Theater Seating

Working On The Riser

Now that the riser height was ironed out I could finish the riser.

Before I added the plywood flooring to the risers I needed to I relocate the cable line from this room out into the hallway closet, where all the theater equipment was going to live.

I also needed to add outlets to power the recliners and the LED light for the riser stairs.

I put two on the bottom of the back wall, and two in the center of each step. 

Adding Lights In The Risers Steps Portrait
The Riser Flooring For The Home Theater Is Installed

Time For The Good Stuff – The Projector, Screen and Speakers

This part took a lot of research and calculating. Check out these posts for details on the projector, screen, and speakers.

Once all the calculations were done I tried everything out before making any holes in the walls.

After testing the projector location, I mounted it to the ceiling and ran an electrical outlet right next to it.

Testing The Projector Location
Installing The Wiring For The Speakers
The Home Theater Projector Screen Is Up

The Home Stretch, The Entrance Sign and Painting

The entrance sign was not a very hard part of the project. The hardest part was finding the right sized letters to put above the doors.

It did take a while to find the right-sized letters to use, I was able to find these at Target.

Testing The Letter Size Above The Home Theater Doorway
The Home Theater Riser Is Complete - Still Need To Paint
Installing The Home Theater Entrance Sign

The Finished Home Theater

Here are a bunch of pictures of the finished home theater.

I love the way the theater came out, it’s even better than I was expecting.

There are still a few more things I still need to do, like making a home for the remote control, something like a cubby hole or shelf where it can be charged.

DIY Home Theater Entrance
DIY Home Theater Entrance Sign
DIY Home Theater Entrance Sign From Front
DIY Home Theater Design - The Final Reveal

What I Would Have Done Differently

If we had to do it all over again, there are a few things I would have done differently. Overall, it would be the same home theater – with a few tweaks.

The Stair Lights

I installed lights in the stairs, which is a look that I thought would be great.
The lights I bought were low voltage, which means they have a transformer, and that means they aren’t dimmable.

In the end, I rarely use the lights in the stairs because they are too bright. If I did this again I would buy regular voltage lights that are dimmable. 

The IR Repeater

I bought an IR repeater to have the remote’s signals sent to the closet in the hallway, where the theater equipment is.
The IR repeater worked great, but it turns out the Logitech remote I bought to replace all the remotes uses a radio signal to communicate with the hub (which is in the closet with the equipment) so I no longer need the IR repeater. 

Getting 4K HDR Streaming Content

This was an expensive lesson. The projector itself doesn’t do any streaming, you need to have a device connected to it that will do that for you.
My idea initially was to get a 4K DVD player and that will have 4K streaming. The first DVD player I bought supported 4K Netflix but the Vudu app on it did not support HDR.

I was building up a movie library on Vudu and wanted to have it in HDR if that was a possibility. So I went on a quest looking for a 4K DVD player that supported Vudu in HDR.

I found one and it worked great, but it was a bit pricy and the menus were kinda slow to get to the streaming apps. I tweeted the macros on the Logitech and got it to work correctly, but slow. As a DVD player it was really good, and the streaming apps were there – just slow to navigate the menus.

Then for some reason, I went and bought a Roku.

Holy cow, that was a game-changer!

It supported 4K everything, HDR everything, and was lightning fast!

If I had to do this again I’d get the cheaper 4K DVD player to play the Ultra-HD DVDs and use the Roku for any Streaming apps.

 

The Entire Shopping List

Here’s a list of everything that we are currently using in our home theater.

You can click on the picture to buy the same one for yourself.

Projector

Designing a Home Theater - The Video Projector - Epson Home Cinema 5040UB 3LCD Home Theater Projector with 4K Enhancement

Projector Screen

Designing a Home Theater - The Fixed Projector Screen - Elite Screens - A Fixed Projector Screen

The Projector BackLight Kit

Designing a Home Theater - The Fixed Projector Screen - The LED Kit

The Amplifier

Designing a Home Theater - Home Theater System - Yamaha TS-R7810

The Remote

Designing a Home Theater - Home Theater Remote - Logitech Harmony Elite Remote

The Passive Amplifier

Designing a Home Theater - Home Theater Subwoofer Amplifier

Roku Ultra

Roku Ultra

The Speakers

Designing a Home Theater - Home Theater Speakers - Acoustic Audio HD728 in-wall ceiling home theater 7.2 surround 8 inch speaker system

DIY Home Theater – Finished!

There you have it, pics of the home theater, during the construction and after the DIY home theater was finished.

I hope you find some ideas and tidbits of info in our project that will help you with yours.

What would you do differently in your home theater? Let me know in the comments below!

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DIY Home Theater Design - The Final Reveal - Portrait

How To Start A Grow Bag Victory Garden

How To Start A Grow Bag Victory Garden

How To Start A Grow Bag Victory Garden



Our latest project is indoor gardening. Our initial attempt at a green thumb was trying to give our kitchen scraps a chance at a second life. We’re still doing that, and in addition we’re also planting seeds.

Since Corona Virus is forcing a ton of people into self-isolation, many have taken on new hobbies. With the news now saying that there may be shortages in fresh produce this summer, it came as no surprise that we weren’t the only ones that chose gardening as our new hobby.

So much so that the trend was even given a name, they’re calling them victory gardens.

We would have loved to grow our victory garden in the yard but in our community the HOA doesn’t allow gardens. 🙁

As an alternative, we started using grow bags. We bought a couple of different sizes to accommodate the different types of plants we were thinking of planting.

Disclosure: Some of the links below are affiliate links. If you decide to purchase any of these products, we earn a small commission at no additional cost to you. We recommend these products only because we have experience with them and use them for our own projects. As Amazon Associates, we earn from qualifying purchases.

What You’ll Need To Start Your Grow Bag Victory Garden

You don’t need very much stuff:

  • grow bags
  • potting soil
  • and maybe a bag of seed starter mix if you prefer to start your seeds in a start mix

The Grow Bags

We bought the grow bags in a couple of different sizes, to give us flexibility in what plants we could grow.

The grow bag size you’ll need will, of course, depend on what you plan on growing and how much of it you plan on planting. 

We figured we’d use the deeper bags for plants that needed the depth, like potatoes, carrots, and beats. Basically, anything that required a deeper root system.

We also got shallower and wider grow bags, giving us more planting surface for with plantings that don’t have deep root systems. Things like lettuce, scallions, onions, garlic, herbs, etc…

The Deep Grow Bags

For the deep grow bags we purchased a couple of packs of 7 gallon grow bags, measuring 13″ diameter x 12″ high.

Each pack has 8 bags, that’s a whole lotta bags to plant veggies in. 🙂

You can click the picture of the bag to get the same deep grow bags.

The Wider Grow Bags

With the wider grow bags we purchased 3 grow bags, each measuring 24″ diameter x 8″ high. It didn’t indicate how many gallons each grow bag was but they are perfect for the plants with shallower root systems.

You can click the picture of the bag to get the same deep grow bags.

The Potting Soil

The potting soil we used was MiracleGro Performance Organics.

We didn’t know how much potting soil we were going to need, so we took a guess and bought 9 – 25 quart bags.

We ordered it from Lowes and had it delivered.

So far we’ve used a couple of bags and we’re using 4 deep grow bags.

Although only one is filled to the top, the others are filled about half way.

How To Start A Grow Bag Victory Garden- Potting Soil

Prepping Your Grow Bag Garden

Prepping your grow bag garden is really as straight forward as you’d imagine.

  • Unfold the grow bag
  • Fill the grow bag up with potting soil
  • Plant your seeds or transplant your plants
  • give your plants a good watering
  • Place the bags in a bright area without too much direct sunlight

One thing I did notice is that although the grow bags breath, they also do a great job of keeping the moisture.

Be careful not to over water your plants. I did that in the beginning and soon found out the plants didn’t like my overly generous watering.

Warning: The grow bags are designed to breath – which is a good thing. But as a result, they also allow moisture to permeate through the bag.  If you’re placing your grow bag on carpet, or wood floors make sure to put something underneath the grow bag so it doesn’t stain or damage your floors. I put a sheet of plastic underneath mine to protect the carpet.

Tip:  When using the deeper grow bags you don’t need to go to the top of the bag if what you are planting has shallow roots. You can fold back the top of the bag, similar to what you do to jeans when they are too long.

That way you don’t use more potting soil than you need to.

What Do You Think Of Our Indoor Victory Garden?

That’s pretty much it. So far, we are loving our new hobby.  It really is exciting to see the progress the plants make every day.

We’re not at the point of having new veggies yet but at this rate, the veggies will be here before we know it. 🙂

I hope this post inspires you to start your own indoor grow bag victory garden and shed some light into how easy it is to start one.

What did you think? Have you ever grown things in a grow bag? How did it work out for you?

Let me know in the comments below! Thanks for reading.

 

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How To Start A Grow Bag Victory Garden
5 Veggies You Can Grow From Kitchen Scraps

5 Veggies You Can Grow From Kitchen Scraps

5 Veggies You Can Grow From Kitchen Scraps



First, let me start off with saying there are definitely waaaay more than just 5 veggies you can grow from kitchen scraps, these are just the first ones I tried. 

With the Corona Virus causing our vacation rental business to come to a screeching halt, we started putting our attention to other interests.

The latest project we’ve taken on is starting a garden, most likely a container garden.

During my perusing on Pinterest, I found a pin on regrowing vegetables from the kitchen scraps.

I just started this project but already have quite a few types of veggies that can be regrown from kitchen scraps.

Like I said, there’s probably many more vegetables you can do this with, but this is a list of the ones I started with.

Disclosure: Some of the links below are affiliate links. If you decide to purchase any of these products, we earn a small commission at no additional cost to you. We recommend these products only because we have experience with them and use them for our own projects. As Amazon Associates, we earn from qualifying purchases.

5 Vegetables You Can Grow From Kitchen Scraps

#1 – Lettuce

This seems to work with all kinds of lettuce, so far I’ve got butter, red leaf and romaine lettuce regrowing from kitchen scraps.

Out of the 3 the romaine seems to have a head start. To be fair, I was apparently more generous with the amount of base I left on the root – I’m guessing that would make a difference.

5 Veggies You Can Grow From Kitchen Scraps - Lettuce

How To Start

When cutting the base of your lettuce head off, cut it about 1 1/2 – 2″ from the bottom. Then take the base and put it in a container with a bit of water on the bottom.

Make sure to change out the water every couple of days and in a few days you’ll start seeing new growth emerging from the center of the base. 

Once you a good amount of growth, your new lettuce plant will probably be happier in soil. I’ve read that it would do fine in water, as long as you change out the water every couple of days.

Personally, when I planted the lettuce in the ground I noticed it started growing better. Maybe its just my imagination, but I’m placing my plants in the soil once they start showing signs of new growth.

Update:  I learned recently that lettuce will shoot up right away when the temperature is above 70 degrees. Since we’re in Florida, those temps make it difficult for us to grow lettuce indoors. We keep the temperature around 75 degrees and the romaine lettuce I was testing with, shot straight up.

I’m trying again, this time with butter lettuce. As soon as the lettuce started growing new leaves I put it in dirt. Lets see if that improves things.

I’ll update this post with its progress.

#2 – Basil

We had a long and leggy basil plant that wasn’t producing many leaves anymore. So I figured I’d try to use a cutting to start a new plant.

So far, the basil I’m trying this with hasn’t made any new roots but I’m pretty confident that it will start rooting shortly.

The cutting looks like it’s doing well in the water, and from what I’ve read, basil is a piece of cake to grow from cuttings.

How To Start

You’ll want to give the cutting enough stem so that it can sit in water without the leaves touching the water. If the leaves sit in the water they’ll start rotting and the water will get cloudy and your cutting will probably die off.

So give the cutting a couple of inches of stem.

Take your cutting and place it in a container with enough water for about an inch of the stem to sit in the water.

Place it in a bright area without direct sunlight and wait. 🙂

5 Veggies You Can Grow From Kitchen Scraps - Basil

#3 – Onions

The onions seem to grow pretty easily, it’s been a week and they look like they’re ready to be put into dirt.

Not sure if an actual whole onion will grow from this experiment but the green stems that grow from it can be used in cooking. The entire plant had an onion flavor.

5 Veggies You Can Grow From Kitchen Scraps - Onions

#4 – Scallions

The scallions are the rock stars of my kitchen scrap garden! They have been in water for maybe about 5 days and have several inches of new growth already on them.

How To Start

Similar to the lettuce cuttings, when you cut the base of the scallions off cut it a bit higher than usual. About a couple of inches of the plant from the base.

Put them in a container with water on the bottom and you are all set.

Since they usually already have some roots, these guys didn’t waste any time growing.

5 Veggies You Can Grow From Kitchen Scraps - Scallions

#5 – Garlic

Ok, so this isn’t exactly using kitchen scraps, since you’re taking the entire unused clove and sticking it into the ground.

Maybe it’s more like a garden tithing. 🙂

I took a few small cloves of garlic and planted them in the dirt next to the tomato slice. They were in the dirt about 3 days and I’m starting to see some green on the tops of a few of the cloves.

I’m guessing they could have also had the base of the garlic sitting in a little puddle of water to get it to start growing but I tried sticking it directly in the ground and that seemed to work like a charm.

5 Veggies You Can Grow From Kitchen Scraps - Scallions

Caring For Your Kitchen Scrap Garden

It’s pretty straight-forward to care for it. Place them in an area that is bright but doesn’t have direct sun.  For the scraps that are in water make sure to swap out the water every day or other day and for the scraps in dirt make sure their dirt stays moist – without over watering.

Before you know it you’ll start seeing new growth and your kitchen scrap garden will by off to the races! 🙂

Once the kitchen plants turn more into plants (either they grow roots are start growing new leaves) I’ll transplant them into grow bags.

Tip:  When cutting the vegetable it seems to help to leave a bit of “meat” along with it. The lettuce and onions that I cut short didn’t seem to grow as fast or well compared to the ones where I left some more “meat”.



That’s My Kitchen Scrap Garden List

There are probably dozens of other veggies you can try this with, these are just the ones I’ve started with. I’m sure I’ll be adding other scraps to the list as I come across new ones.

Once the veggies grow a bit I’ll be transferring them to grow bags.

 What did you think? I know I personally will never look at kitchen scraps the same way again. 🙂

Have you ever tried recycling your kitchen scraps? If so what veggies did you try? Did it work for you?

Lemme know in the comments below.

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5 Veggies You Can Grow From Kitchen Scraps

3 Time Saving Tips For DIY Plank Plywood Floors

3 Time Saving Tips For DIY Plank Plywood Floors

3 Time Saving Tips for DIY Plank Plywood Floors



Now that we have two DIY plank plywood floors projects (the dining room and the living room) under our belts, we’ve learned a bunch of things – things to do and things not to do. We’re going to cover 3 Time Saving Tips For DIY Wide Plank Plywood Floors.

If you’re planning on making your own wide plank flooring made from plywood, then make sure to take a look at this list – it will save you tons of time… and sanity :).

We wrote detailed articles for each of those projects (see below for links) but we also wanted to write a short article highlighting the biggest time saving tips we have.

Here are the 3 things you need to know for making your own wide plank plywood floors. Following these tips will make your project go smoothly and you’ll end up with better-looking plywood floors.

Disclosure: Some of the links below are affiliate links. If you decide to purchase any of these products, we earn a small commission at no additional cost to you. We recommend these products only because we have experience with them and use them for our own projects. As Amazon Associates, we earn from qualifying purchases.

DIY Plank Plywood Floors Tips

A Bonus Tip First – Cut The Boards Yourself

Yeah, it’s a little different to get the bonus tip first, but a few of the tips piggy back on this one. So it makes sense to share this first.

And I know that cutting the boards yourself sounds like the opposite of a time saver, but let me explain. 

There are a few posts out there that recommend having the person at Lowes or Home Depot cut the plywood into planks for you.

I know that sounds like it would save you tons of time, because you’re offloading the cutting on them, but I wouldn’t recommend doing that.

We’ve had home improvement stores cut the plywood for us on other projects in the past.

Although it does save you time – we don’t think it’s worth it. Their cuts are not very accurate, like really inaccurate.

That may be perfectly find for certain projects, but with this project consistent cuts are important.

Having boards that are all about the same width allows your project to go smoother, easier and the end result will look much nicer.

#1 Make A Jig

OMG – If I didn’t use a jig I don’t know if I would have ever finished this project. The jig gives you consistent cuts and also allows you to easily rip through the pile of plywood.

The next best tool to use would have been the table saw, but it’s a super distant second to using a jig.

The jig wasn’t hard to make and it didn’t take very much time.

Take a look at the jig details in the dining room flooring article.

There you’ll find out how to make one and how how to attach it to the circular saw.

DIY Rustic Wide Plank Plywood Flooring - Secure The Jig To The Circular Saw Using Screws

#2 Don’t Use A Plywood Blade

This deserves another OMG. I tried using a plywood blade to cut the plywood into planks initially and that was a BIG MISTAKE!

Ignore the plywood blades – instead, use the cross-cut blades.

Like I said in the dining room flooring article, the plywood blade didn’t even make it through two sheets of plywood.

When I used the cross-cut blade, a single blade did the rest of the plywood for the dining room and also the living room!!

If you’re keeping score, the plywood blade barely ripped 2 sheets of plywood into planks and the cross-cut blade did 19 sheets – and it can still do more.

This is hands down the best blade for cutting plywood planks. It cut through the plywood like butter, and also didn’t splinter the wood at all.

(Click the picture to order the same blade we used on Amazon)

 

The best blade to cut your plywood planks is a cross cut balde

#3 Skip Sanding Between Polyurethane Coats

When we did the dining room floor, we lightly sanded the bumps out of the coat of polyurethane with 120 grit sandpaper.

It’s what I’ve always thought you needed to do between coats and it’s also what I read in other plywood flooring blog posts.

With the living room floors, we figured that the bumps would even out a little after multiple coats of the poly were applied. 

3 Time Saving Tips For DIY Wide Plank Flooring - Skip The Sanding Between Polyurethane Coats

Besides, the bumps would add a bit more texture making the floors less slippery.

The only concern we had was how it would feel walking barefoot on the floor with more texture. When we ran our hands on the planks we could clearly feel the additional texture, so we were a bit nervous.

Well, it turns out, the additional texture was barely noticeable when walking on the floor barefoot. Phew, that was a relief!

There You Have It

Those are our time saving tips for DIY wide plank plywood floors. These few simple tips will save you HOURS and HOURS of time. Without them, our project would have taken A LOT longer and would have been harder to do.

The first two tips alone will save you from pulling your hair out! 

We hope they will help you with your own wide plank plywood flooring.

Let us know what you think!

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3 Time Saving Tips for DIY Plank Plywood Floors

DIY Farmhouse Wide Plank Flooring Made From Plywood

DIY Farmhouse Wide Plank Flooring Made From Plywood

DIY Rustic Farmhouse Wide Plank Plywood Flooring - a closeup of the distressing and Knots



The first farmhouse wide plank flooring made from plywood project we did was in the dining room earlier in the year.

Well, we loved it so much we did the same wide plank flooring in the living room.

For the most part, both the floors were done the same way, with a couple of exceptions. In this article, we’ll go over the differences between the two floors.

Check out the dining room plywood floor article to see more of the step by step details.

As far as time goes, the dining room’s wide plank flooring took about a week to finish and the living room took a lot longer.

The living room is a bit bigger, but what really added time to the project were the shimming and the end grain flooring inlay.

From start to finish, it took a little over two weeks to finish the living room floor.

Disclosure: Some of the links below are affiliate links. If you decide to purchase any of these products, we earn a small commission at no additional cost to you. We recommend these products only because we have experience with them and use them for our own projects. As Amazon Associates, we earn from qualifying purchases.

What We Did Different With This Farmhouse Wide Plank Flooring

The methods we used for the flooring in the dining room and the living room were pretty much the same.

In the living room, we pulled up the old carpet, removed staples, painted the sub-floor a dark color and put down the floor the same way it was done in the dining room.

The width, length and thickness of the plywood planks was the same, and we cut, sanded, distressed, stained and added 3 coats of polyurethane to the flooring in almost the same way.

There were some small changes we made that saved us a little time and may have added some more character to the plywood plank floor.

Here are the things we did a bit differently.

We Didn’t Sand Between Polyurethane Coats

When we did the dining room floor, we lightly sanded the bumps out of the coat of polyurethane with 120 grit sandpaper.

With the living room floors, we figured that the bumps would even out a little after multiple coats of poly were applied.

Besides, the bumps would add a bit more texture making the floors less slippery.

The only concern I had was how it would feel walking barefoot on the floor with more texture.

Turns out, despite clearly feeling the additional texture when running your hand on the plank, it was barely noticeable when walking on it barefoot.

The Shopping List

Tools List
Here’s a list of the tools we used on this project, it’s basically the same list of tools from the dining room flooring project.

Affiliate links below may be to similar items when exact items couldn’t be found online.

Cordless Finish Nailer

Extra Battery For Finish Nailer

Belt Sander

Palm Sander

Miter Saw

Circular Saw

Cross Cut Saw Blade

Oscillating Multi-Tool

Hearing Protection Ear Muffs

Table Saw

 

Supplies List

These are the supplies used on this project.

Affiliate links below may be to similar items when exact items couldn’t be found online.

Varathane Cherrywood Gel Stain – we used about 7 quarts

Water Based Oil-Modified Poluyrathane – we used 2 gallons

3″ Natural Bristle brush – 6 brushes to apply the stain

4″ Polyester Synthetic Brush – 4 brushes to apply the poly

Masking Paper – We used the masking paper to protect the deck when applying the stain and poly

6 Gauge 1 1/2″ Finish Nails

A New Character Builder Was Used

The same original cast of character builders were used with the living room floors, a hammer, pliers and a propane torch… and this time we added a utility knife to the arsenal.

For the dining room we would dig into crack in the wood using the sanders to open the cracks up and soften the edges.

This time we used a utility knife to lengthen and widen the cracks in the wood.

Then we softened the edges of the cracks with the sander.

The result was even better than we imagined.

The deep cracks we made with the utility knife gave us the aged, farmhouse wide plank flooring look we were going for.

You wouldn’t even guess that it was plywood.

DIY Farmhouse Wide Plank Flooring Made From Plywood - The Plywood Floor Finished - Close up of the Distressing Done With A Utility Knife

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Feels Like Heaven - A Premium 5 Bedroom Vacation Rental in The Poconos, PA

We Added Shims

The living room floors were much more uneven then the floors in the dining room.

To the point where we needed to add shims in the low spots to try and level things off a little.

I went around the floor with a straight edge, and where ever there was a dip, I added shims.

Since I knew I needed a good amount of shims, I made them out of a sheet of 1/4″ plywood. I ripped the sheet into 1″ strips using the table saw.

Once the floor was shimmed, we painted the floor a dark brown color, just like we did in the dining room.

DIY Farmhouse Wide Plank Flooring Made From Plywood - The Plywood Floor Finished - Wood Strips Used To Fill The Low Spots
DIY Farmhouse Wide Plank Flooring Made From Plywood - The Plywood Floor Finished - Starting The Plywood Flooring Install

The Living Room Plywood Floor Is Finished!

Like I said, the living room floor took much longer to do than the dining room floor did. It took a little over two weeks to finish, had I not messed up with the wood slice accent flooring, we would have finished in about 2 weeks.

Check out the wood slice accent flooring project here

We love the farmhouse wide plank flooring in both the dining room and the living room. This style was the perfect fit for this house, we couldn’t have imagined a better fit.

Between the two floors, I’d say I’d stick to the steps used on the living room floor.

Sanding between poly coats seems to have been unnecessary, and using the utility knife to expand on the cracks in the wood added sooo much more character to the living room floor – LOVE IT!

Here are a few more pictures of the stained plywood floors on the living room floor.

Let me know what you think, is there something you would have done differently?

Share your thoughts in the comments below!

 

DIY Farmhouse Wide Plank Flooring Made From Plywood - The Plywood Floor Finished - Close up of the Distressing
DIY Farmhouse Wide Plank Flooring Made From Plywood - Close up of The Plywood Floor In The Living Room By The Wood Accent
DIY Farmhouse Wide Plank Flooring Made From Plywood - The Plywood Floor Finished - Finished Plywood Floor Seen From The Stairs
DIY Farmhouse Wide Plank Flooring Made From Plywood - The Plywood Floor In The Living Room By The Wood Accent
DIY Farmhouse Wide Plank Flooring Made From Plywood - The Plywood Floor Finished
DIY Wide Plank Plywood Flooring
DIY Farmhouse Wide Plank Flooring Made From Plywood - The Plywood Floor Finished - Another Close up of the Distressing
DIY Farmhouse Wide Plank Flooring Made From Plywood - The Plywood Floor Finished - Seen From The Corner Of The Fireplace
DIY Farmhouse Wide Plank Flooring Made From Plywood - The Plywood Floor Finished By The Fireplace
DIY Plywood Plank Flooring

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DIY Farmhouse Wide Plank Flooring Made From Plywood
DIY Farmhouse Wide Plank Flooring Made From Plywood Fireplace - Portrait
DIY Farmhouse Wide Plank Flooring Made From Plywood Closeup - Portrait
DIY Farmhouse Wide Plank Wide Plank Plywood Flooring