Designing a Home Theater - Home Theater System - Yamaha TS-R7810



Like the projector and projector screen, there are many options for a home theater system. And just like the projector, the sky is the limit when it comes to pricing.

The first thing you’ll need to figure out on your home theater system search is what features are important to you.

If you were like me, you don’t even know what features you’re looking for.

Hopefully, my research will help cut a few hours off your amplifier search.

*PLEASE NOTE, SOME OF THESE LINKS ARE AFFILIATE LINKS. THAT MEANS IF YOU CLICK ON ONE OF THE PRODUCT LINKS, WE’LL RECEIVE A SMALL COMMISSION AT NO EXTRA COST TO YOU. IT HELPS SUPPORT THIS BLOG AND ALLOWS US TO KEEP SHARING OUR CONTENT FOR FREE. AS AN AMAZON ASSOCIATE I EARN FROM QUALIFYING PURCHASES.

What I Was Looking For In A Home Theater System

For the surround sound system, my criteria list was pretty straight forward:

  • 5.1 surround sound
  • Enough HDMI inputs (since the home theater system was going to control the inputs)
  • a good enough wattage to get my attention

The home theater system is the heart of your theater setup. It controls all the video sources, so all the video signals pass through it.  Since the projector in my setup was both 4K and HDR capable, the amplifier needed to support both 4K and HDR.

Designing a Home Theater - Home Theater System - The Home Theater System Is The Heart Of The Home

Options For A Home Theater System

Dolby Digital Options

Dolby, THX or DTS

There are three different standards for a home theater system – Dolby, THX, and DTS.

By far, the most common standard of the three is Dolby digital. I wasn’t able to figure out the differences between the three – other than THX and DTS usually cost more.

Because THX and DTS cost more, the choice, in the end, was more about which flavor of Dolby to get.

Which flavor really depends a lot on the speaker budget – and how many speakers can fit into that budget.

What Flavor Of Dolby?

I had always heard of Dolby Digital 5.1 but never really knew what the numbers meant. All I knew was that 5.1 was a good surround sound system.

In my search for a surround sound system, I finally understood the numbers.

A 5.1 system means there are 5 surround sound speakers and 1 subwoofer.
The 5 surround sound speakers would be:

  • the center speaker
  • left and right front speakers
  • left and right rear speakers

In our days, there are a lot of systems that are Dolby Digital 7.1 surround sound. The difference in the 7 in 7.1 surround sound system and the 5 in 5.1 is the additional two back speakers.

When shopping for speaker systems, you’ll come across a third number, like 5.1.2 or 7.1.4. That third number is the number of in-ceiling speakers, also called presence speakers.

The latest iteration of Dolby is Dolby Atmos. The way they describe it is that is object-oriented sound. Which means Atmos does a better job of determining what sound should go pushed to what speaker.

Below is a table with the different speaker layouts.

 

The Different Dolby Speaker Layouts

Speaker
5.1
5.1.2
5.2.2
7.1
7.2
7.1.2
Center Speaker
X
X
X
X
X
X
Left Front Speaker
X
X
X
X
X
X
Right Front Speaker
X
X
X
X
X
X
Left Rear Speaker
X
X
X
X
X
X
Right Rear Speaker
X
X
X
X
X
X
Second Left Rear Speaker
 
 
 
X
X
X
Second Right Rear Speaker
 
 
 
X
X
X
Ceiling Speaker Count
0
2
2
0
0
2
Subwoofer Count
1
1
2
1
2
1

If you want more details about the different Dolby speaker setups, below is a great link from Dolby. (Fair warning it gets pretty speaker geeky)

Dolby Atmos Speaker Setup Guide




Other Features Available

There are a lot of features available on home theater systems. But most of them aren’t a factor for a dedicated home theater system.

In my case, the surround sound system was only for the movie theater. And really only for the audio from a TV, DVD, NetFlix, etc…

Features like multi-zone, Bluetooth streaming, wifi streaming, and network audio playback are available. But none of those mattered in my setup at all.

The Home Theater System I Chose

Like I said earlier, your speaker budget will be the driving force behind your home theater system decision.

In the end, I found a great price on a set of 7.2 speakers, so I knew I could start looking for a Dolby 7.2 home theater system.

The amplifier I ended up going with is the Yamaha TSR-7810 7.2-Channel Network Receiver, which I purchased online.

It had great reviews and more than enough features for my setup at a reasonable price.

The amplifier has 7.2 channel surround sound, DTS:X, Dolby Atmos, the 4K HDR passthrough and support for 3D. It met all the criteria from my list, and it was also a reasonable price.

Designing a Home Theater - Home Theater System - Yamaha TS-R7810
Designing a Home Theater - Home Theater System - Yamaha TS-R7810 - Back

Get The Same Home Theater System

Click To Get The Same Home Theater System - Yamaha TS-R7810

Yamaha TS-R7810 7.2-Ch x 95 Watts Networking A/V Receiver Same as RX-V781

Tips For This Home Theater System

Here are a few tips that’ll help your Yamaha amplifier sound it’s best.

Make Sure To Run The YPAO Test

The YPAO test made a significant improvement in my setup. I would definitely recommend running the test if you have a Yamaha home theater system that has YPAO.

The amp comes with a microphone that you plug into the front of the amp. All you need to do is center the microphone in the listening space and start the test.

Make sure you’re not standing between the microphone and any of the speakers while the test is being run. That way, you don’t interfere with the microphone picking up the speaker sounds.

Designing a Home Theater - Home Theater System - Yamaha TS-R7810 - YPAO Mic

When I ran my test, I placed the mic on the top of the center seat in the theater. Then I started the test and stayed out of the room until it was complete.

YPAO will do a few tests on the speakers and optimize the audio for the space.

I’d say there was a big difference in the surround sound quality after the test ran. Even a non-audiophile like me was able to tell the difference.

Enable The Enhancer Option

Sound quality is not always an easy thing to describe. But enabling the enhancer option on the amp gives the sound a nicer, deeper, fuller sound.




Something To Keep In Mind About Home Theater Systems

My past purchases for home theater systems have always included powered (active) subwoofers.

An active subwoofer is one that has an amplifier built-in, a passive subwoofer doesn’t.

When you’re dealing with a passive subwoofer, you’ll need to buy a separate amplifier to power the subwoofer.

That was a fact that escaped me when I was doing my research for a home theater system. I only figured it out when I installed the amplifier and speakers, and sadly, my subwoofers had no sound coming out of them.

After a few web searches, I found out I needed to buy a separate passive subwoofer amplifier.

About Steve

Hi, I'm Steve. My wife Sandy and I have been doing DIY projects for years now and we finally created a blog to help share our projects and ideas. We hope you find these posts useful. 🙂

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